Tag: Climate Change

1
United States Announces Intent to Withdraw From Paris Climate Accord: What is the Real Impact?
2
Military Urges Renewed Commitment to Renewable Energy
3
CEQ Issues Final Greenhouse Gas Guidance Directing Federal Agencies to Consider Climate Change in their NEPA Reviews

United States Announces Intent to Withdraw From Paris Climate Accord: What is the Real Impact?

By William M. Keyser, Laurie B. Purpuro, Cliff L. Rothenstein, Alyssa A. Moir, and Christina A. Elles

On June 1, President Trump declared that he would withdraw the United States from the Paris Climate Accord (the “Agreement”).  His announcement, though not unexpected, raises a host of questions on several legal, technical, and policy fronts.  And while the news and commentary on President Trump’s position continues to change, three fundamental questions are worth asking:

  1. How is the Agreement structured to handle withdrawal?
  2. What legal actions could potentially force the Trump administration to take actions to address climate change?
  3. What impact, if any, would a withdrawal have on U.S. state and private-side initiatives to address climate change?

We focus our analysis on these questions in this Legal Insight, which you can view on K&L Gates HUB.

Military Urges Renewed Commitment to Renewable Energy

By Scott Aliferis and Elana Reman

On January 12, 2017, Noblis, in partnership with the Pew Charitable Trusts, released a report on energy assurance on U.S. military bases. Cost-effective and reliable energy is crucial to the success of U.S. military missions, and the Department of Defense’s (DoD) fixed military installations account for 1 percent of the total electrical energy consumed by the United States, costing almost $4 billion. The military has long relied on the commercial grid, with standalone generators during peak use, but these sources are vulnerable to disruption due to aging infrastructure, severe weather, and both physical attacks and cyberattacks. Instead, the report proposes shifting to a strategy of large-scale microgrids. It conducts a cost comparison, addresses implementation issues, and analyzes the efficiency and security of microgrids, concluding that they would be superior to the military’s current system for supplying energy.

The Pew Charitable Trusts recently held a panel discussion, which supplements the report’s findings, focused on the intersection of national security, energy, and climate change. Three military secretaries examined past successes, and Dr. Jeff Marqusee, the Chief Scientist of Noblis and author of the report, discussed how the military could enhance its energy security going forward. The panelists argued that investment in renewable energy should continue to be a priority for the U.S. military because its goal is increasing mission assurance. The testimony was followed by a roundtable discussion and Q&A session.

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CEQ Issues Final Greenhouse Gas Guidance Directing Federal Agencies to Consider Climate Change in their NEPA Reviews

By Craig Wilson, Cliff Rothenstein, Sandra Safro, Ankur Tohan, David Wochner and Michael L. O’Neill

On August 2, 2016, the White House Council on Environmental Quality (CEQ) published a final version of its guidance to federal agencies requiring the consideration of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions and effects on climate change when evaluating potential impacts of a federal action under the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA). CEQ explains that it does not expect the Final Guidance to be applied to federal actions for which a NEPA review has been concluded or actions for which a final environmental impact statement or environmental assessment has been issued. As discussed in greater detail below, although the Final Guidance is not legally binding on federal agencies, various aspects of the document have the potential to delay permitting timelines as agencies determine whether and how to incorporate the Final Guidance into their reviews and very likely will add to the level of review that agencies undertake.

To read the full alert, click here.

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